Skip Navigation and Go To Content
News from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Stories from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston)

Navigation and Search

Education

UTHealth Houston Emergency Medicine provides training to Polaris Dawn crewmembers

Huy Hoang, MD, emergency medicine resident with UTHealth Houston Emergency Department, trains SpaceX Polaris Dawn mission's medical officer Anna Menon (left) and mission specialist Sarah Gillis (right) in lifesaving techniques. (Photo by UTHealth Houston)

June 29, 2022

Along with educating students, residents, and fellows in the most advanced lifesaving therapies on Earth, UTHealth Houston Department of Emergency Medicine is helping to prepare members of the Polaris Dawn crew to handle medical emergencies in space. The Department of Emergency Medicine, which has been training NASA astronauts in emergency medical care for more than 10 years, recently welcomed Polaris Dawn’s medical officer Anna Menon and mission specialist Sarah Gillis for a week-long space medicine training session.



UTHealth Houston’s UTMOVE program receives distinguished Edmond J. Safra Fellowship in Movement Disorders

Clinic staff and former UTMOVE fellows, from left to right: Alicia Lerma, medical assistant; Shivika Chandra, MD; Mya C. Schiess, MD; Swati Pradeep, DO; Melissa Christie, MD; and Humberto Leal Bailey, MD. (Photo by UTHealth Houston)

April 28, 2022

UTHealth Houston’s Movement Disorders and Neurodegenerative Diseases Fellowship Training Program (UTMOVE fellowship program) has been chosen by The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) as one of eight international academic centers to train a new movement disorder clinician-researcher — a neurologist with additional training and expertise in diagnosing and treating Parkinson’s and related diseases — as part of the Edmond J. Safra Fellowship in Movement Disorders Class of 2025.








How to talk to your children about the Ukraine invasion

Talking with your children about the recent Ukraine invasion can look different depending on their age, according to a child and adolescent psychiatrist at UTHealth Houston. (Photo by Getty Images)

March 4, 2022

With updates regarding Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on abundant TV channels and websites, it’s almost impossible to shield children from the unsettling news. Nor should they be, according to Leslie K. Taylor, PhD, child and adolescent psychologist with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) and its clinical practice, UT Physicians.



Page 1 of 10

More headlines »

Search UTHealth News

Use the form below to perform a new search.

Give to UTHealth