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An epidemiologist breaks down the numbers on Johnson & Johnson’s single-dose vaccine

An image of a women receiving a vaccine in her left arm. (Photo by UTHealth).

February 27, 2021

While the Johnson & Johnson single-dose COVID-19 vaccine that has now received emergency use authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has a lower efficacy rate compared to other previously approved vaccines, an expert with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) explains why it is still a significant step toward ending the COVID-19 pandemic.


Heart month: Researchers create Texas’ first statewide cardiac arrest registry, highlight racial disparities in CPR training

Photo of Salil Bhandari, MD, demonstrating how to do bystander CPR safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by UTHealth)

February 26, 2021

Projections from Texas’ first cardiac arrest registry show that every day at least 60 Texans will suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which is a sudden loss of heart function, breathing, and consciousness. If bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is performed, the victim’s chance of survival can triple, but less than half of victims in the Lone Star State receive any bystander CPR, according to data from the registry.



A mother’s intuition: Quick-thinking mom brings son to Houston for lifesaving surgery

At just two weeks old, Imani was diagnosed with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA), a rare heart defect that affects less than 1% of babies. (Photo by Amira Carson)

February 25, 2021

When doctors in her home state told Amira Carson there was nothing they could do to save her son’s life, she didn’t take no for an answer.

At just two weeks old, Imani was diagnosed with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA), a rare heart defect that affects less than 1% of babies. In CCTGA, the two lower ventricles and their attached valves are reversed.


Innovative treatments and multidisciplinary team work to help glioblastoma patients

Photo of Flint Greer and his wife, Jamie. (Photo courtesy of Flint Greer)

February 25, 2021

Flint Greer, 24, of Pollock, Louisiana, and Alberto De Solo, 70, of Miami, Florida, don’t know each other, but they have something critical in common: Both traveled to Houston for innovative brain cancer treatment from a team of brain care physicians with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).


Researchers identify characteristics of highest utilizers for mental health hospital services

Photo of Jane Hamilton, PhD, investigates characteristics of high utilizers for mental health hospital services. (Photo credit: Cody Duty/UTHealth)

February 24, 2021

Dropping out of high school, having schizophrenia, or being diagnosed with a co-occurring personality disorder increases the likelihood of someone becoming a “high utilizer” of inpatient psychiatric hospital services, according to a new study by researchers at UTHealth. A high utilizer is someone who has been admitted three or more times within one year.


How to prevent carbon monoxide exposure

If you want to use your vehicle to warm up, take a slow trip around the block or around the parking lot, but get your vehicle away from your garage and home.  (Photo by Getty Images).

February 18, 2021

As Houstonians brace for more below-freezing temperatures, medical experts with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) are concerned those without power may continue to turn to risky measures to heat their homes that could lead to carbon monoxide poisoning.  


CPR performed by wife gives Houston man time to reach hospital care and cardiac surgery

Quan Collins, 49, received life-saving CPR by his wife which allowed him to get care from Cesar Nahas, MD, a cardiothoracic surgeon with UT Physicians and UTHealth. (Photo by Quan Collins)

February 12, 2021

It was a typical evening workout for Pearland resident Quan Collins before the 49-year-old passed out after a two-mile run with his wife, Ganesa. Without hesitation, Ganesa dialed 911 and began CPR by performing chest compressions. This action helped pumped blood out of his heart, and kept it circulating during what was later identified as cardiac arrest.



Using genetics to solve diseases – Dianna Milewicz leads research in aortic aneurysms and dissections

Dianna Milewicz, MD, PhD, has discovered the majority of genes that are now known to cause a predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. (Photo by UTHealth)

February 11, 2021

Dianna Milewicz always knew she wanted to work in science.  

“At a very early age I took an interest in medicine,” said Milewicz, MD, PhD, the President George Bush Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). “In kindergarten, I decided I wanted to be a nurse, but becoming a doctor never crossed my mind.”



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