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Adequate folate levels linked to lower cardiovascular mortality risk in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are 60% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease. Photo by Getty Images.

February 26, 2020

Decreased folate levels in the bloodstream have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, shedding light on why those patients are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, according to research published today in JAMA Network Open by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).




UTHealth’s homeless health care delivery solution among top 100 proposals for MacArthur $100 million grant

Photo of UTHealth researchers investigating a sustainable health care delivery solution for individuals experiencing homelessness. (Photo credit: Theresa Crowley/UTHealth)

February 19, 2020

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation today announced that a proposal by UTHealth to create a sustainable health care delivery solution for individuals experiencing homelessness is in the Top 100 for the foundation’s 100&Change competition. As a semifinalist, UTHealth is vying for a single $100 million grant to help solve one of the world’s most critical social challenges.



Valentine’s Day heartbreak turns to healing

Rebekah Holl pictured with her husband Donald. Last year Rebekah spent Valentine’s Day in the hospital for a procedure to place a catheter and a pacemaker on her heart. (Photo courtesy of Rebekah Holl).

February 14, 2020

A broken heart for Valentine’s Day sounds like the plot of a romantic comedy. But for Rebekah Holl, a literal broken heart was her reality on Feb. 14, 2019. Born with a rare defect called d-Transposition of the Great Arteries, she underwent open-heart surgery as an infant to correct the way blood circulates throughout her body. Though rare, congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defects – affecting about 1% or 40,000 births per year in the U.S.



OB-GYNs step up preeclampsia prevention by recommending low-dose aspirin for all patients

Photo of OB-GYNs now recommending patients take a low-dose aspirin of 81 milligrams daily to prevent preeclampsia. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

February 13, 2020

Lowering the risk of developing a life-threatening condition while pregnant is as simple as taking low-dose aspirin every day, according to OB-GYNs at UTHealth. They are now recommending their patients take a low-dose aspirin of 81 milligrams daily to prevent preeclampsia as part of routine prenatal care, just like taking a prenatal vitamin.





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