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Graphic showing the disparities of multiple sclerosis presentation across ethnicities. (Graphic by Rogelio Castro/UTHealth)

Research shows race is a factor in disparities of symptom prevalence and response to treatment in multiple sclerosis treatment

Black and Hispanic patients develop more disability from multiple sclerosis (MS) and respond to treatments for the disease differently compared to white patients who also have the disease, according to recent findings presented by researchers at UTHealth. 

A UTHealth fetal intervention team led by Ramesha Papanna, MD, MPH, with has received a $3.2 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for preclinical research on a new approach to repair spina bifida in utero.

Fetal intervention research team studies new regenerative patch as treatment for spina bifida

A fetal intervention team led by Ramesha Papanna, MD, MPH, of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has received a $3.2 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for preclinical research on a new approach to repair spina bifida in utero.

Photo of the Houston Habitat for Humanity ribbon cutting ceremony. On April 13, Houston Habitat for Humanity and KPRC-TV Channel 2 hosted a ribbon-cutting for Alma Armendaris' new home. (Photo courtesy of Houston Habitat for Humanity)

There's no place like (a Habitat for Humanity) home

Throughout a year of hardships, challenges, and sometimes grief, it's important to take the time to honor the happy moments; the official ribbon-cutting for the 2021 Houston Habitat for Humanity home was just that. 

Photo of boy wearing mask with head in hands. Mental health-related visits to hospitals for children and teens has increased since the COVID-19 pandemic began due to increased stress. (Photo courtesy of Getty Images)

Report shows mental health concerns rising among children and teens during the pandemic

In addition to the physical health problems caused by the pandemic, there has been a heavy mental health toll from months of lockdown and upheaval - particularly for children and teens. 


With virtual meetings here to stay, experts give tips on ways to bring some humanity back to our screens

Photo of a person falling asleep during a virtual meeting while kids are on devices in the next room. (Photo courtesy of Getty Images)

Sitting in small offices, big conference rooms, or giant auditoriums to collaborate with colleagues has been replaced by little squares on computer screens. Family pets, the doorbell, and children sometimes vie for attention, and if you want to take a bite of food, you turn off the camera. For better or worse, the way we meet has been forever changed as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. But experts at UTHealth think there are some easy things to do so all of these virtual experiences don't lead to burnout and fatigue. 





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