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Clinical Research Studies

Current Studies

  • Acute Ischemic Stroke and Ischemic Stroke Trials at 18-36 Hours Post-Stroke

    Intrepid - Impact of Fever Prevention in Brain Injured Patients

    Multiple studies demonstrate that fever / elevated temperature is associated with poor outcomes in brain injured patients; however, there are no conclusive studies that demonstrate that fever prevention/controlled normothermia is associated with better outcomes. This study will be conducted to assess the impact of advanced temperature control to prevent fever in brain injured patients. The fever prevention group will use the Arctic Sun Temperature Management System and will be compared to standard care patients in whom fever may spontaneously develop. If fever develops in a patient in the standard care group, they will be treated with standard fever care measures according to a step-wise algorithm, consisting primarily of intermittent antipyretics (e.g., acetaminophen) and cooling blankets and, when necessary, advanced targeted temperature management devices.

    PI: Huimahn A Choi

    Coordinator: Glenda L Torres

    Multi-arm Optimization of Stroke Thrombolysis (MOST)

    The primary efficacy objective of the MOST trial is to determine if argatroban (100µg/kg bolus followed by 3µg/kg per minute for 12 hours) or eptifibatide (135µg/kg bolus followed by 0.75µg/kg/min infusion for two hours) results in improved 90-day modified Rankin scores (mRS) as compared with placebo in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients treated with 0.9mg/kg IV rt-PA within three hours of symptom onset. Patients may also receive endovascular thrombectomy (ET) per usual care. Time of onset is defined as the last time the patient was last known to be well.

    PI: Andrew Barreto, MD

    Coordinator: Jamey D. Franklin

    Sedation versus General Anesthesia for Endovascular Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke (SEGA)

    The majority of strokes are the result of blood clots in the main vessels that provide blood to the brain. When people suffer from a stroke, these blood clots produce a blockage to the normal flow of blood, which can cause brain tissue to be damaged. This often produces symptoms such as weakness or numbness to one side of the body, changes in vision, or changes in people’s abilities to speak or be understood.
    Although the body may break up the blood clots on its own, doctors also use a clot-busting drug called rt-PA for patients with certain types of stroke. Unfortunately, rt-PA is not always successful in breaking up clots. Larger clots can also be removed from the brain by performing an emergency surgery called endovascular therapy which can restore normal blood flow. Endovascular therapy with stent retrievers have been shown to improve outcomes in acute stroke patients. However, there is still some controversy about the best type of anesthesia – general anesthesia (GA) vs sedation (CS) to be used during endovascular therapy.
    The purpose of this study is to study whether GA during endovascular therapy results in better outcomes compared with CS during endovascular therapy among acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PI: Roc Chen, MD

    A Randomized Controlled Trial to Optimize Patient's Selection for Endovascular Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke (SELECT 2)

    SELECT 2 evaluates the efficacy and safety of endovascular thrombectomy compared to medical management alone in acute ischemic stroke patients due to a large vessel occlusion in the distal ICA and MCA M1 who have large core on either CT (ASPECTS: 3-5) or advanced perfusion imaging ([rCBF<30%] on CTP or [ADC<620] on MRI: ≥50cc) or both and are treated within 0-24 hours from last known well.

    The second aim is to look at the correlation of imaging profiles with thrombectomy clinical outcomes and treatment effect. This will be evaluated by comparing the outcomes in patients with discordant imaging profile and assessing if thrombectomy outcome rates and treatment effect will differ in patients with discordant imaging profiles (favorable CT/unfavorable perfusion imaging and unfavorable CT/favorable perfusion imaging).

    PI: Amrou Sarraj, MD

    Coordinator: Faris Shaker

    Thrombectomy for Emergent Salvage of Large Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke (TESLA)

    The primary objective of the trial is to establish the effectiveness of IAT (versus medical management) in patients with moderate-large infarcts (NCCT ASPECTS 2-5) at baseline, with adaptive enrichment to better define the upper limit of infarct volume for treatment eligibility. Furthermore, the investigators aim to determine whether certain subgroups of patients with large baseline infarcts will have a greater treatment benefit. Finally, the investigators will assess the agreement of ASPECTS scores between site investigators, the core imaging lab, and automated software.

    PI: Sunil Sheth, MD

    Coordinator: Victor S Lopez Rivera

    A Phase III, blinded, randomized trial of thrombolysis in imaging-eligible, late-window patients to assess the efficacy and safety of Tenecteplase (TIMELESS)

    This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of a clot dissolving medication, tenecteplase, in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who arrive in the emergency department in the 4.5- to 24-hour time window. This may extend the treatment window from the current 4.5 hours restrictions to up to 24 hours after AIS.

    PI Andrew Barreto, MD



  • Acute Brain Hemorrhage

    Recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) for Hemorrhagic Stroke Trial (FASTEST)

    The objective of the rFVIIa for Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Administered at Earliest Time (FASTEST) Trial is to establish the first treatment for acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) within a time window and subgroup of patients that is most likely to benefit. The central hypothesis is that rFVIIa, administered within 120 minutes from stroke onset with an identified subgroup of patients most likely to benefit, will improve outcomes at 180 days as measured by the Modified Rankin Score (mRS) and decrease ongoing bleeding as compared to standard therapy.

    PI: James Grotta, MD

    Coordinator: Patti L Bratina

    Intrepid - Impact of Fever Prevention in Brain Injured Patients

    Multiple studies demonstrate that fever / elevated temperature is associated with poor outcomes in brain injured patients; however, there are no conclusive studies that demonstrate that fever prevention/controlled normothermia is associated with better outcomes. This study will be conducted to assess the impact of advanced temperature control to prevent fever in brain injured patients. The fever prevention group will use the Arctic Sun Temperature Management System and will be compared to standard care patients in whom fever may spontaneously develop. If fever develops in a patient in the standard care group, they will be treated with standard fever care measures according to a step-wise algorithm, consisting primarily of intermittent antipyretics (e.g., acetaminophen) and cooling blankets and, when necessary, advanced targeted temperature management devices.

    PI: Huimahn A Choi, MD

    Coordinator: Glenda L Torres

  • SAH Trials

    Prospective Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Filtration After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage via Lumbar Catheter (PILLAR)

    The PILLAR-XT study is designed to further confirm safety and characterize efficacy of Neurapheresis therapy. The study works in tandem with the current SOC treatments for SAH and does not detract from the established care pathways, or deny enrolled subjects proven therapies. The PILLAR-XT study utilizes the established skill sets of chosen Investigators who are already trained in the treatment and care of SAH patients and insertion/management of lumbar drains. 

    The objective of this study is to further demonstrate safety and characterize effectiveness of the Neurapheresis™ System (extracorporeal system and catheter) to remove red blood cells (RBCs) and lysed blood by-products from hemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH).

    PI: Spiros Blackburn, MD

    Intrepid - Impact of Fever Prevention in Brain Injured Patients

    Multiple studies demonstrate that fever / elevated temperature is associated with poor outcomes in brain injured patients; however, there are no conclusive studies that demonstrate that fever prevention/controlled normothermia is associated with better outcomes. This study will be conducted to assess the impact of advanced temperature control to prevent fever in brain injured patients. The fever prevention group will use the Arctic Sun Temperature Management System and will be compared to standard care patients in whom fever may spontaneously develop. If fever develops in a patient in the standard care group, they will be treated with standard fever care measures according to a step-wise algorithm, consisting primarily of intermittent antipyretics (e.g., acetaminophen) and cooling blankets and, when necessary, advanced targeted temperature management devices.

    PI: Huimahn A Choi, MD

    Coordinator: Glenda L Torres

    Role of Haptoglobin Genotype on Neuroinflammation and Coagulation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (NIH K23NS106054)

    An estimated 2 percent of the population harbors an intracranial aneurysm, and every year more than 30,000 aneurysms will rupture in the U.S. Many who survive go on to have with crippling cognitive and motor deficits despite aggressive surgical and medical intervention. This project seeks to investigate the promising finding that Haptoglobin genotype predicts outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and beyond this, novel mechanisms of inflammation and coagulation to determine future therapeutic targets.

    PI: Spiros Blackburn, MD

  • In Hospital Studies

    Optimal Delay Time to Initiate Anticoagulation after Ischemic Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation (START)

    Primary Objective: To determine the optimal time to initiate anticoagulation with a Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulant (NOAC) after ischemic stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Secondary Objectives:

    • To compare the rates of primary adverse outcomes in a per protocol analysis
    • To compare 30 day clinical outcomes by the modified Rankin scale among the time-to-treatment groups
    • To compare 30 day clinical outcomes by the PROMIS-10 scale among the time-to-treatment groups.
    • To compare 90 day clinical outcomes by the modified Rankin scale among the time-to-treatment groups
    • To explore the optimal timing in subgroups of age, sex, outcome category, and NOAC choice

    PI: Alicia Zha, MD

  • Stroke Prevention Trials

    Optimal Delay Time to Initiate Anticoagulation after Ischemic Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation (START)

    Primary Objective: To determine the optimal time to initiate anticoagulation with a Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulant (NOAC) after ischemic stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Secondary Objectives:

    • To compare the rates of primary adverse outcomes in a per protocol analysis
    • To compare 30 day clinical outcomes by the modified Rankin scale among the time-to-treatment groups
    • To compare 30 day clinical outcomes by the PROMIS-10 scale among the time-to-treatment groups.
    • To compare 90 day clinical outcomes by the modified Rankin scale among the time-to-treatment groups
    • To explore the optimal timing in subgroups of age, sex, outcome category, and NOAC choice

    PI: Alicia Zha, MD
    Coordinator: Gabretta Cooksey

    AtRial Cardiopathy and Antithrombotic Drugs In prevention After cryptogenic stroke (ARCADIA)

    ARCADIA is a multicenter, biomarker-driven, randomized, double-blind, active-control, phase 3 clinical trial of apixaban versus aspirin in patients who have evidence of atrial cardiopathy and a recent stroke of unknown cause. Eleven hundred subjects will be recruited over 2.5 years at 120 sites in the NINDS StrokeNet consortium. Subjects will be followed for a minimum of 1.5 years and a maximum of 7 years for the primary efficacy outcome of recurrent stroke and the primary safety outcomes of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and major hemorrhage other than intracranial hemorrhage.

    PI: Anjail Sharrief, MPH, MD
    Coordinator: Gabretta Cooksey

    Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial (SLEEP-SMART)

    Sleep SMART has a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) design. It is a multi-site, parallel-group superiority trial that compares 6 months of OSA treatment to usual care. The study includes two trials: a prevention study with an embedded recovery trial. 3062 subjects will be randomized over 5 years at 110 sites within the NINDS-funded StrokeNet clinical trials network.

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with positive airway pressure starting shortly after acute ischemic stroke or high risk TIA (1) reduces recurrent stroke, acute coronary syndrome, and all-cause mortality 6 months after the event, and (2) improves stroke outcomes at 3 months in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke.

    PI: Anjail Sharrief, MPH, MD
    Coordinator: Audrey Cohen

    Stroke Telemedicine Outpatient Prevention Program for Blood Pressure Reduction (STOP STROKE)

    The purpose of this pilot trial is to compare post-stroke care blood pressure (BP) treatment using an interdisciplinary telehealth model [called the Stroke Telemedicine Outpatient Program (STOP) for Blood Pressure Reduction] to usual care in stroke patients at risk for uncontrolled BP. The intervention will address general and stroke-related factors associated with racial disparities in BP control. We will assess feasibility of implementation of the trial and will use the measures and outcomes assessed in the pilot to examine knowledge gaps.

    PI: Anjail Sharrief, MPH, MD
    Coordinator: Gabretta Cooksey

    A Study on BMS-986177 for the Prevention of a Stroke in Patients Receiving Aspirin and Clopidogrel (AXIOMATIC)

    The purpose of this clinical study is to determine whether the addition of an oral Factor XIa Inhibitor to Aspirin and Clopidogrel is more effective than standard therapy in secondary stroke prevention.

    PI: Anjail Sharrief, MPH, MD

    Coordinator: Audrey Cohen

    Anticoagulation for Stroke Prevention and Recovery after ICH (ASPIRE)

    ASPIRE is a randomized, double-blinded, phase III clinical trial designed to test the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation, compared with aspirin, in patients with a recent ICH and high-risk non-valvular AF (CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥ 2). Seven hundred patients will be enrolled over 3.5 years and followed for study outcomes for a minimum of 12 months and maximum of 36 months. The primary efficacy outcome is any stroke (hemorrhagic or ischemic) or death from any cause. The secondary efficacy outcome is the change in the modified Rankin Scale score. Recruitment will take place at sites coordinated through the NIH/NINDS StrokeNet.

    Primary Aim: To determine if apixaban is superior to aspirin for prevention of the composite outcome of any stroke (hemorrhagic or ischemic) or death from any cause in patients with recent ICH and atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Secondary Aim: To determine if apixaban, compared with aspirin, results in better functional outcomes as measured by the modified Rankin Scale.

    PI: Andrew Baretto, MD

    Coordinator: Prasen Marella

     

  • Recovery Trials

    TRANScranial direct current stimulation for Post-stroke motor Recovery – a phase II sTudy (TRANSPORT-2)

    This research study is to find out if brain stimulation at different dosage level combined with an efficacy-proven rehabilitation therapy can improve arm function. The stimulation technique is called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The treatment uses direct currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain affected by stroke. The adjunctive rehabilitation therapy is called "modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy" (mCIMT). During this therapy the subject will wear a mitt on the hand of the arm that was not affected by a stroke and force to use the weak arm. The study will test 3 different doses of brain stimulation in combination with mCIMT to find out the most promising one.

    PI: Gerard Francisco, MD

    Coordinator: Dorothea M Parker

    Perinatal Arterial Stroke: A Multi-site RCT of Intensive Infant Rehabilitation (I-AQUIRE)

    This is a Phase III clinical trial to compare the efficacy of two dosages of a new infant rehabilitation protocol - I-ACQUIRE - to usual and customary forms of infant rehabilitation in infants who experienced Perinatal Arterial Stroke (PAS).

    The proposed study is a Phase III trial powered to determine efficacy of two different doses of I-ACQUIRE for children 8 to 36 months old with PAS and hemiparesis. The design is a prospective Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) in which 240 children will be randomly assigned to one of 3 treatment groups (N=80 per group): 1) Moderate Dose I-ACQUIRE (3 hours/day, 5 day/week X 4 weeks), 2) High Dose I-ACQUIRE (6hrs/day, 5 days/week X 4 weeks), or 3) Usual and Customary Treatment (U&CT). I-ACQUIRE will be delivered by protocol-trained therapists and monitored weekly for dosage and treatment fidelity; U&CT will be provided by community therapists with dosage and approaches documented weekly. All primary and secondary efficacy outcomes rely on blinded assessments at baseline, end of treatment, and 6 months post-treatment. Exploratory outcomes and supplemental clinical measures may provide valuable additional data about development and health in this sample of children with PAS.

    PI: Stuart Fraser, MD

    Coordinator: Samantha Acosta, MA

    Contact: Samantha.D.Acosta@uth.tmc.edu

    Ischemic Stroke Trials at 18-36 hours Post-stroke

    MultiStem® Administration for Stroke Treatment and Enhanced Recovery Study (MASTERS-2)

    MultiStem is an allogeneic, regenerative medicine advanced therapy (stem cells) indicated for treatment of acute ischemic stroke within 36 hours after symptom onset. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MultiStem on functional outcome in participants with ischemic stroke. Further, we want to evaluate the impact of MultiStem on a patient’s quality of life and healthcare and rehabilitation services utilization; and to evaluate the mechanism of action of MultiStem through blood biomarkers, and spleen and brain imaging outcomes in subjects. This is a randomized blinded study.

    PI Sean Savitz, MD

      Coordinator: Parker, Dorothea M <Dorothea.M.Parker@uth.tmc.edu>

      NCS-01 (KPharma / IA stem cell)

      This is an initial Phase1/2 dose-finding, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of NCS-01 in patients with acute ischemic stroke. All patients will be randomized within 24 hours of stroke onset. This study will be conducted in 2 stages.

      PI: Sean Savitz, MD
      Coordinator: Dorothea M Parker

       

    Brain Health Research

    Brain health refers to the overall wellbeing of the brain, which is a vital organ that controls our thoughts, emotions, movements, and bodily functions. Maintaining good brain health is essential for maintaining cognitive function, memory, and mental well-being. Through this dual commitment to research and community outreach, the Stroke Institute invites you to take a quick survey to see if you qualify to participate in two brain health studies we are currently enrolling for!

    TAKE THE SURVEY

    Brain Health Studies

    • Brain Health Study: MARK VCID

      MARK_VCID_LOGO_Linked_To-Website

      Click here to learn more about MARK VCID

      With your help, we can learn what are the biological markers (or biomarkers) that can help distinguish healthy aging from dementia. We aim to enroll participants of diverse backgrounds living in the Houston area. Results from this study will provide recommendations for future clinical trials on dementia.

      Is this study right for me? 

      We are inviting women and men who are:

      • Aged 60 to 90 years
      • Hispanic, Black/African American, or non-Hispanic White
      • Currently living in the Houston area and able to attend study examinations 

      What is expected of me if I join the study?

      The study comprises an initial visit and three yearly follow-up examinations. Each study visit will include:

      • a blood draw
      • clinical and health questionnaires
      • tests of memory and thinking
      • a brain scan

      Will there be compensation?

      You will receive compensation for your participation in this study.

      Each visit is compensated with $100. You will receive up to $400 if you take part in all the four study visits.

      Who will have access to my information?

      Your information will be maintained in secure databases and kept private.


      To learn more contact:

      Heather Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, CBIS

      Speech-Language Pathologist | Research Coordinator

      Stroke Recovery Research 

      heather.smith.1@uth.tmc.edu

      (713) 500-7909 

      MARK VCID WEBSITE

    • Brain Health Study: DIVERSE VCID

      DIVERSE_VCID_LOGO_Linked_To-Website

      Click here to learn more about DIVERSE VCID 

      Diverse VCID means researchers are looking for a diverse population to study: African American, Latino and Caucasian individuals. VCID stands for Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia. This study will examine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain. 

      Is this study right for me?

      We are inviting men and women who are:

      • Aged 65 and 90 years
      • Have noticed a decline in their memory or thinking over the last 1-3 years
      • African American, Hispanic/Latino, or non-Hispanic White
      • Can attend  3 visits to a center near you over a 3–-4 year period (you have the choice to opt out of the study at any point)
      • You are able to have an MRI (you cannot have any metal in your body)

      What is expected of me if I join the study?

      • Answer some questions about yourself
      • Receive a medical examination
      • Review your medical history and current care plan
      • Complete a brain MRI and a blood draw
      • Complete memory tests and thinking

      Will there be compensation?

      You will be reimbursed $50 for your time upon undergoing the screening MRI. If it is determined you are eligible to participate and complete the remaining baseline study procedures, you will be reimbursed an additional $100 for each visit. If you complete all visits and MRIs, you will receive a total of $450.

      Who will have access to my information?

      Your information will be maintained in secure databases and kept private.


      To learn more contact:

      Heather Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, CBIS

      Speech-Language Pathologist | Research Coordinator

      Stroke Recovery Research 

      heather.smith.1@uth.tmc.edu

      (713) 500-7909 

      DIVERSE VCID WEBSITE


    Pediatric Research

    UTHealth Stroke Program has been conducting high caliber research in stroke for a long time, and our Pediatric Stroke Program is proudly carrying that tradition forward. We are part of the International Pediatric Stroke Study, where we work with other scientists from all over the world. We are also involved in other research studies funded by the National Institutes of Health, as well as conducting retrospective and prospective studies. These studies focus on how we can better treat stroke when it happens and help children recover afterwards.

    Want to help us on this journey? We're always looking for volunteers to join our studies. Check out the information below to learn more about our studies that are currently recruiting participants. Together, we can make life better for kids with stroke.

    Pediatric Stroke Studies

    • Describe

      Describe - Coming Soon

    • I-ACQUIRE

      Perinatal Arterial Stroke: A Multi-site RCT of Intensive Infant Rehabilitation (I-AQUIRE)

      The UTHealth Pediatric Stroke Program is part of a nation-wide research study named I-ACQUIRE. This study is focused on helping young children who had a stroke when they were born. Specifically, we are trying to help children who had what is called a Perinatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke (PAS). Children who have difficulty moving one side of the body or the other from this type of stroke are potentially candidates.

      In this study, we're testing two different levels of a new kind of therapy (I-ACQUIRE) to see how it helps kids aged 8 to 36 months who had PAS. This study will include 240 children, randomly divided into three groups:

      1. Moderate Dose group: Children in this group will receive the I-ACQUIRE therapy for 3 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks.
      2. High Dose group: Children in this group will receive the I-ACQUIRE therapy for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks.
      3. Usual and Customary group: Children in this group will continue to receive their regular therapy in their community.

      We will carefully track each child's progress from the beginning of the therapy, at the end of 4 weeks, and then 6 months after the therapy. Our goal is to learn more about the best ways to help children who have had a PAS.

      To see study flyer CLICK HERE

      The study is recruiting patients currently. If you are interested in having your child participate in this study or just want more information, feel free to reach out to Samantha Acosta at the email below.

      PI: Stuart Fraser, MD

      Coordinator: Maria Poblete

      Contact: maria.poblete@uth.tmc.edu

    • FOCAS

      The FOCAS study is a critical research project being shared by multiple children’s hospitals in the United States aimed at improving treatment for children who may have a condition called Focal Cerebral Arteriopathy of childhood (FCA). FCA is a disease that can lead to stroke in children when one side of the brain does not receive sufficient blood supply.

      While FCA is not common, it poses a serious risk due to its potential to quickly worsen, causing recurrent or expanding strokes. This study, FOCAS, is designed to determine the most effective treatment strategy.

      The study will involve two groups:

      Group A: Children in this group will receive a medication known as corticosteroids immediately upon suspicion of FCA.

      Group B: Children in this group will receive corticosteroids only if their FCA shows signs of progression.

      To gauge the effectiveness of the treatment, we will use a measure called the FCA Severity Score (FCASS). We will compare the score from the beginning of the study to 1 month later. In addition, we will measure the size of any strokes and assess overall child health outcomes at 6 months.

      The FOCAS study is poised to significantly enhance our understanding and treatment of children with FCA. The study is expected to begin in September 2023.

      The study is recruiting patients currently. If you are interested in having your child participate in this study or just want more information, feel free to reach out to Neena Patel at the email below.

      PI: Stuart Fraser, MD

      Coordinator: Antoinette W. Bernal-Tent

      Contact: antoinette.bernaltent@uth.tmc.edun

    • TOPSS

      TOlerability of transcranial direct current stimulation in Pediatric Stroke Survivors

      The TOPSS Study is a research project by the UTHealth Pediatric Stroke Program that's looking at new ways to help kids get better after a stroke. This study is for kids and teenagers who had a stroke when they were at least 1 month old and now have a hard time moving one side of their body.

      In this study, kids will try a new type of treatment for stroke. They'll get regular occupational therapy, which helps them learn to do daily tasks, along with a special treatment called non-invasive neuromodulation, which uses safe and gentle electricity to try to help the brain recover. Kids between 5 and 19 years old who have trouble moving their arm because of a stroke can join this study.

      If your child joins the study, they'll have 5 occupational therapy sessions to try to improve the use of their weak arm, and at the same time they'll also receive the non-invasive neuromodulation treatment. We hope that this might help them use their arm better after having a stroke.

      Dr. Stuart Fraser is in charge of the study, and Melika Abrahams is the research nurse who will help with the study.

      The study is open now and we are recruiting. If you or your child would like to be part of the study, you can email pedistroke@uth.tmc.edu or call Melika at 713-500-7164.

      To see study flyer CLICK HERE

      This study is partially funded through the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology Pilot Grant Program.

    • IPSS

      The International Pediatric Stroke Study (IPSS) is the largest childhood stroke registry in the world. UTHealth and Children’s Memorial Hermann are part of this registry, joining a worldwide network of children’s hospitals who share data about pediatric stroke to learn important information to try to help children with stroke.

      Dr. Stuart Fraser is the IPSS leader at UTHealth.

      For more information, please visit the IPSS website:

      https://internationalpediatricstroke.org/ipss-research


    Mental Health Research

    The Mental Health Program focuses on developing behavioral interventions, supports, and therapies for this crucial post-stroke period. We are interested in learning about how the interventions can improve post-stroke psychosocial stress so that we can improve the education and support services for those who have had a stroke and their informal caregivers in our communities.

    Mental Health After Stroke Studies

    • Post-Stroke Depression

      Research study for depression in stroke patients

      If you have experienced a recent stroke within the past 4 to 12 weeks and are struggling with depression, our ongoing research study may be able to assist you.

      What you can expect:

      • No cost MRI and PET scan
      • Free mental health evaluation
      • Referral to mental health provider
      • Transportation costs covered
      • Referral to Innovative Intervention Studies for Depression

      More Information:

      Contact Mariano Montemayor at 713.486.6091 or email Mariano.R.Montemayor@uth.tmc.edu

    • Learn more about our Mental Health Program at the Stroke Institute

      Mental Health Following A Stroke

      Our brain is in charge of most things in our body, including our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. When someone experiences a stroke, it can affect parts of the brain that control our mood and behavior so that they no longer work as they used to before the stroke. That is why those who have had a stroke often struggle with common mental health problems, such as anxiety, depression, and social isolation, during and after their recovery. In general, we call these concerns Post-Stroke Psychosocial Stress.

      Post-stroke, when patients do not get treatment for post-stroke psychosocial stress, it can take longer for them to feel better during their recovery. This can have a negative effect on survivors’ quality of life as well, which in turn can worsen the post-stroke psychosocial stress. Add to this the fact that when these patients discharge directly home from the hospital without additional supportive services they are only able to receive care from family members, spouses, and loved ones, whom we call informal caregivers. Because informal caregivers usually don’t have any medical training, they can feel overwhelmed and develop caregiver burden and psychosocial stress. Increased caregiver burden can affect the informal caregiver’s ability to help those who have had a stroke through their recovery. This means that both the patient and their informal caregiver’s psychosocial stress can increase, which can also make recovery more difficult.

      Fortunately, there are helpful therapies and supports for those who have had a stroke and their informal caregivers. Receiving these kinds of supports can improve the post-stroke recovery process and quality of care for their loved ones by reducing post-stroke psychosocial stress.

      The Mental Health Program focuses on developing behavioral interventions, supports, and therapies for this crucial post-stroke period. We are interested in learning about how the interventions can improve post-stroke psychosocial stress so that we can improve the education and support services for those who have had a stroke and their informal caregivers in our communities.

      Learn more at uth.edu/stroke-institute/programs/mental-health-core


    Stroke Prevention Research

    The Stroke Prevention Program's Research department is a pioneering center dedicated to advancing our understanding of stroke and developing effective strategies for prevention. Areas of interest also include stroke disparities, and health services. Welcome to a space where innovation meets compassion, and together, we strive to make a lasting impact on stroke prevention worldwide.

    Stroke Prevention Studies

    • SleepSMART

      Sleep for Stroke Management and Recovery Trial

      The primary goals of this study are to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with positive airway pressure starting shortly after acute ischemic stroke or high risk TIA (1) reduces recurrent stroke, acute coronary syndrome, and all-cause mortality during 6 months after the event, and (2) improves stroke outcomes at 3 months in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke.

      Prior studies have shown a clear independent association between OSA, which has a prevalence similar to hypertension among stroke patients, and development of stroke and poor outcomes after ischemic stroke. If the Sleep SMART hypotheses are confirmed, a new strategy to prevent stroke recurrence and improve stroke recovery will be available.

      To learn more about this trial, please fill out this short online form »

    • VIRTUAL

      Video-based Intervention to Reduce Treatment and Outcome Disparities in Adults Living with Stroke or TIA

      This randomized trial strives to provide care over telehealth channels with remote blood pressure monitoring. Patients are asked to check blood pressure daily and also meet with their outpatient stroke provider at designated times either in person or through video visits. Benefits include a free blood pressure monitor and enhanced post-stroke blood pressure monitoring that is not typically provided to stroke patients.

      To learn more about this trial, please fill out this short online form »

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